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Atterbury & Co.'s Swan Oil Lamps
Atterbury Swan With screw connector
Atterbury Swan With screw connector
Atterbury Swan Fused fount & base
    a brief historical profile of     
Atterbury & Company
   

Atterbury Log Cabin
Atterbury's "Log Cabin" Lamp
James S. and Thomas B. Atterbury joined brother-in-law James Hale to form Hale & Atterbury in 1860 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The grandsons of Sarah Atterbury Bakewell (sister of Benjamin Bakewell and founder of Bakewell's Glass Company), opened their White House Factory at Carson and McKee streets in Pittsburgh's South Side. Hale was the firm's glassblower. He was replaced two years later by James Reddick who left Atterbury in 1864. The company's name thus was changed from Hale, Atterbury & Co., to Atterbury, Reddick & Co. , then Atterbury & Co. before finally bearing the name Atterbury Glass Co. in 1893.1 Thomas Atterbury served as the company's president throughout it's history.

Atterbury Shoe
Atterbury's "Shoe" Lamp
Thomas Atterbury was the principal inventor in the firm. His name appears on at least 110 patents relating to the glass manufacturing process and machinery - 71 for inventions and 39 for designs.2 Atterbury & Co. was assigned at least forty-two lighting-related patents between July 20, 1869 and May 3, 1887. See the patent table below for details. The design for a screw socket that connects the base and font of kerosene lamps is one patent for which the firm is famous. The screw connector was patented by Thomas and James Atterbury, patent number 82,579, dated September 29, 1868.

Screw Connector
Atterbury's Screw Connector Patent #82,579, Sept. 29, 1868.
View another version here.
Atterbury & Co. made a variety of items: canning jars and lids, bar bottles, covered dishes, salt & pepper shakers and other tableware, and lamps. Its covered dishes made out of opal or milk glass often featured animal designs - rabbits, ducks, chicks, bulls and boars heads. An industry leader in the manufacture of lamps, the firm won an award in 1876 at Philadelphia's Centennial Exhibition for its lamp chimneys and globes.3

Atterbury remained an independent factory until 1903.



    
MagnifySearch Atterbury & Company's Patents
   

Patents assigned to Atterbury & Co. between July 20, 1869 - May 3, 1887
RE3556 RE7529 D4298 31714 32739 34345 34555 35429
35430 37267 38087 38457 40594 47267 47268 57063
79298 82579 96986 102204 109369 109370 140988 145548
159061 164669 168863 170219 170431 176160 181618 183277
209542 212421 213605 214273 214274 214345 275562 275563
313399 362415
[ additional patents will be added as they are discovered ]
D = Design Patent, RE = Reissue of an earlier Patent
30662
Some of Atterbury's non-lighting patents
39027
50437 54665 59159 75110 89005 103702 132558 139993

To view any of the above patents, enter the number in the box below and select Query USPTO Database. This will take you to the specific patent images on the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office Database. Learn more about the USPTO here.

Enter Patent Number  

  


    
End Notes
   
  • 1 Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Atterbury Glass Co. 1860 - 1893. (10 Feb. 2003). <http://151.201.61.20/locations/scitech/ptdl/pgh/atterbury_glass.html>
  • 2 ibid.
  • 3 ibid.
    
References
   
  • Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Atterbury Glass Co. 1860 - 1893. 10 Feb. 2003. <http://151.201.61.20/locations/scitech/ptdl/pgh/atterbury_glass.html>
  • Thuro, Catherine M.V. Oil Lamps: The Kerosene Era in North America. Radnor, PA: Wallace-Homestead, 1976.
  • --- Oil Lamps 3: Victorian Kerosene Lighting 1860-1900. Toronto: Collector Books, 2001.



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